St. Matthew’s Talent Show September 17

  
Sunday, September 17 
5:30 p.m. 
Followed by 
ICE CREAM SOCIAL!
in the parish hall
$10/person, $25/family
All proceeds go to
Southeast Gwinnett Cooperative Ministry
St. Matthew’s, we’re calling you to come and show us all how much amazing talent this church has. We’re looking for performance and artistic talenfor this year’s talent show. If you have something that you want to showcase, please come and tell Liz Livermont by September 7th.
For the first time ever, we’re wanting to showcase art pieces. So, if you have a painting, drawing, sculpture, or pottery you want to display for this event, please let us borrow it for a time. All ages are encouraged to participate in any way. This is a wonderful event and it’s amazing to see how much talent we have in this church.
Whether or not you have a talent you want to share, we hope you will come and support everyone else on September 17th at 5:30.
Tickets will be on sale starting August 27th after the services. All proceeds go to benefit the Southeast Gwinnett Cooperative Ministries.
Let’s have a show to help support an incredible organization!
Liz Livermont, Director



Share this on your social network:

Text of Sermon, Proper 15, Year A, Reverend Liz Hendrick

Several people have requested a copy of this sermon, so it has been made available here.

Sermon Text, Proper 15, Year A
August 20, 2017
Isaiah 56:1, 6-8; Psalm 67; Romans 11:1-2a, 29-32; Matthew 15:21-28

Note: A recording of this sermon can be found here. (Scroll down to Sermon Audio on that page).

Last week, I was away at a conference for chaplains. The group was made up of several Christian denominations, as well as one Imam. For the first two days, folks in the group wanted to be able to pray in the style they were used to, but were afraid of offending the Imam. Sentences would start, with all due respect to our Muslim brother, I think Jesus would want us to…”

Finally, after one afternoon break, we returned to the room to find the Imam standing next to the moderator. He told us how much he appreciated our trying to be sensitive. Then he said this, “Let me share with you a little about Islam. You honor God, we do too. You honor Jesus, we do too. You honor Mary his mother, we do too. You believe Jesus was born of a virgin by the power of God’s spirit; we do too. You believe that Jesus will return at the end of time, we do too. You believe in heaven, we do too. You believe in hell, we do too. Between Christianity and Islam, there are many more areas where we are alike than where we are different. Please pray in the way to which you are accustomed”. It was a generous speech from a man whose faith group has been targeted, along with Jews, by various hate groups.

We have a long history in this country of marginalizing those we see as other – not just today, and not just during WWII or the civil rights era, but dating back to at least the 1700’s.

• In 1785, to Catholics proposing to build St. Peter’s church in the heart of Manhattan, there was such an outcry that city officials, fearing the papacy, forced the Catholics to relocate outside the city. Twenty years later, on Christmas Eve, protesters gathered outside the church, outraged, and scared by the mysterious services than went on inside, rioted, injuring many and killing one police officer. The mysterious services? What we would call today the High Mass of Christmas Eve.
• In 1845, Americans were fearful of all the Catholic Irish arriving in the US, refugees from the Great Hunger due to destruction of their potato crop. These Irish were desperate for food and so would take any job. The prejudice became so strong that job ads on signs and in the newspaper stated, No Irish need apply.
• By the end of the 19th century, suspicion had moved to the Italians, with their persecution being seen by President Teddy Roosevelt as “rather a good thing”.

We can go further back in history – all the way to the bible. In the time of Jesus, Jews saw themselves as God’s chosen; everyone else were pagans. Without converting to Judaism, the pagans were outside of God’s grace. You could not associate with them; could not eat with them; could not cross the threshold into their homes. Given the time in which Jesus lived, his ignoring the pleas of the Canaanite woman would have been appropriate and his initial response to her persistence, harsh as it was, would have been acceptable by those around him. Remember, his disciples wanted Jesus to tell her to shut up and go away.

This is a hard story. Hard for a woman, brought up in a region known today as Lebanon, to approach and ask anything of a Jew – a race she was brought up to despise. Hard for Jesus to even see this person – a woman and a foreigner. And hard for us to see Jesus acting in a way that is, frankly, uncharacteristic of Jesus. But the woman is desperate to receive healing for her child – what parent here does not know of her anxiety? She does not take Jesus’ initial silence as a final answer – she continues to call out. And when he rudely dismisses her, she counters with a show of faith that commands his attention, broadens his understanding of his mission, and moves him to action. It is a life changing moment – for Jesus, for the woman and her daughter, and for us. It is possible that in this encounter, Jesus understands his mission to be more than he realized. He came not just for the house of Israel, but for us all.

After the death and resurrection of Jesus, as the faith of Christianity moved out of Jerusalem and spread across the known world, Gentiles new to the faith would start to see themselves as “chosen” and would look with contempt on the Jewish members of their communities. It is to address the treatment of their Jewish members by Gentile Christians that Paul is writing in his letter to the church in Rome. And contrary to the hold many have on God’s plan of salvation being uniquely for Christians, Paul states that God has not rejected the people of Israel, for, in the words of Paul, the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable. Paul is not talking about a remnant but the gathering by God of all Israel.

In the irony and mystery of God, Jews believing they are uniquely chosen find God’s mercy goes beyond them to include those they would consider as “other”. Gentile Christians in Rome, believing they are now the inheritors of God’s favor, hear Paul say that in God’s plan, all Israel shall be saved. And if you go all the way back to the writing of Isaiah in the 6th century before Christ, God’s plan to draw the circle wider began long before Jesus. Listen to the words of Isaiah: “And the foreigners who join themselves to the Lord, to minister to him, to love the name of the Lord, and to be his servants…these I will bring to my holy mountain and make them joyful in my house of prayer…for my house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples”.

So, what’s going on here? It seems like God may have a plan for salvation for humanity that is – well – in a word – inclusive. Jesus’ view was changed by the deep faith of a woman who refused to be silent; who refused to be relegated to the shadows. The church in Rome realized that God did not choose Gentile over Jew, but used Israel to open salvation to the Gentiles so that all the world could be drawn into his love. It seems that the common denominator is not being Jewish, nor being Christian, nor being Muslim. The common denominator is FAITH.
It is people who draw lines of separation: Irish, or Catholics, or Italians, or blacks, Latinos, or Syrians or any one of several groups today. And it is God – consistently – over the ages – suggesting that our view is too narrow – that the wideness of God’s embrace can take us all in. As the Imam said, there are many more areas where we are alike than different.

I hope we can find room in our hearts to believe this. But it is not enough to believe – we need to speak. Note that Jesus was silent to the woman’s first plea. But she did not remain silent – the stakes were too high. They are for us as well. If we do not stand up for the right of all people to worship God in their own way in peace, we risk someday finding our own practices at risk for persecution. Remember, it was only a little over 230 years ago that the Catholic faith was under attack in this country.

Think of it this way – the eclipse is tomorrow – how many are planning to try and watch – either from here or by making the journey to go north? And you will be wearing special glasses, right – to protect your eyes, because you can sustain serious eye damage if you try and look directly at the sun without them. Think of our mission as requiring spiritual glasses, tinted with the grace of God’s love, with which we are to see the world. Without them, we risk judging those who are different from us. But with these glasses, we see in each person the spirit of grace common to us all. AMEN.



Share this on your social network:

Hurricane and Flood Relief

The recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida, and subsequent flooding in Houston has been devastating. It’s going to take the folks years to recover. Imagine having to leave your home and everything in it to be destroyed by floods.

To donate to Hurricane and flood relief through Episcopal Relief and Development,  click here.



Share this on your social network:

August 2017 Bulletins and Announcements

Aug. 20, 2017 – Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost 8 a.m.

Aug. 20, 2017 – Eleventh Sunday After Pentecost 10.30 a.m. with Epiphany Choir

Aug. 20, 2017 – Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost Announcements

Aug. 13, 2017 – Tenth Sunday after Pentecost 8 a.m. and 10.30am

Aug.13, 2017 – Tenth Sunday After Pentecost Announcements

Aug. 6, 2017 – Transfiguration of our Lord – 9th Sunday after Pentecost 8 a.m. and 10.30am

Aug 6, 2017 – Ninth Sunday After Pentecost Announcements



Share this on your social network:

Youth Service Retreat–“Seek and Serve”

June 15-18 was our youth service retreat, fulfilling our Baptismal vows to “seek and serve Christ in all persons, loving our (local) neighbors as ourselves”. We sought to see Christ in all people from all different walks of life. We responded to three major issues: hunger, refugees, and homelessness.

Youth Service Retreat “Seek & Serve”

HUNGER

The first day, we learned about hunger, both globally and in our local area, then responded by serving at the Southeast Gwinnett Food Cooperative ministry. Some of our youth served in the pantry, filling orders and loading up clients’ cars. Some of our youth played outside with the children of clients while they got their food. Our youth experienced so much joy playing there!

REFUGEES

Next, we focused on refugees. We headed down to Clarkston to learn about several ministries with refugees, including Intertwined Candles, which provides jobs to mothers who need to work from home so they can also care for their children. We attended a rally at Refuge Coffee Company (which helps provide job skills to refugees by training them as servers and baristas). The rally was in celebration of World Refugee Day, where many different nations were represented. We heard the stories of resettlement of two refugees, one from Syria and one from Congo. Our youth were inspired with ideas for how we can serve the needs of refugees in our own area.

HOMELESSNESS

Finally, we learned about the issue of homelessness. On Sunday, we were joined by another youth group from St. Mark’s in Jacksonville (their youth minister is a childhood friend of our youth minister). Together, our youth groups packed lunches for the Church of the Common Ground, an Episcopal community which worships in Woodruff Park, largely attended by the homeless in that area. Thanks to the generosity of St. Matthew’s, we were also able to provide them with TONS of socks for their foot care clinic.

SEEKING & SERVING CHRIST IN ALL PERSONS

Each day, we reflected on how we had seen Christ in each person. The youth saw Christ in so many ways…in the delight of the children playing with bubbles or hula hoops, in the delight of their parents watching them play, in the creativity of a street performer at the Refugee Day rally, in the bright blue eyes of a soft-spoken man we met on the street, who attended church with us, in all our brothers and sisters in Christ that we met for the first time, and when we passed the peace, and the barriers seemed to come down. It was an incredible and amazing experience! If you get a chance, ask one of the youth to tell you what was meaningful to them! They will have so much to say, and they’d be happy to share!

 



Share this on your social network:

Vacation Bible School July 10-14

A special thank you to the church and all the lovely volunteers for their help during this summer’s Hero Central VBS. We had around 100 kids on campus and they had a blast! From Charmaine helping me with the color printer to ensure the perfect name tags to Oscar, Sylvia and the youth moving the Fellowship Hall dividers to the sanctuary to create our “cityscape”, VBS has truly been a work of love. Through this week, I’ve watched the volunteers holding hands and comfort crying kids as well as helping them create art and explore what it means to be a true hero in God. For me, it was easy to see what a hero was because any group of people who give up time–our most important non-renewable resource–to help foster God’s love in our youth are heroes in the truest sense of the word. A heartfelt thank you to all of you, especially the center leads who spent many hours preparing their center – VBS would be nothing without you. You are all heroes!

Kira Coats

VBS Director

 

 



Share this on your social network:

Stephen Ministry Comes to St. Matthew’s

On May 7th, Ted Sawyer, a long-time member of St. Matthew’s, was commissioned as a Stephen Minister at a ceremony at First United Methodist Church of Lawrenceville. This is no small feat. To achieve this highly responsible position, Ted had to successfully complete 50 hours of intense training over a course of 8 months. Ted is now prepared to offer the care-giving services of a Stephen Minister to his fellow parishioners.
At that same ceremony, Susan Jung and Priscilla Trescott were officially named leaders of the new program. To become Stephen Leaders, Susan and Priscilla had to successfully complete a rigorous 50-hour specialized training for leaders. This training qualifies Susan and Priscilla to oversee the program (along with Mother Liz) and to train other Stephen Ministers. Both Susan and Priscilla have also completed the 50 hour Stephen Ministry program twice and have served as Stephen Ministers at other Episcopal churches.
This ceremony also officially launches the Stephen Ministry program at St. Matt’s. Ted, Susan, and Priscilla are now available to offer the distinctively Christian care giving they have learned to the members of St. Matthew’s.
What is Stephen Ministry all about? Who does it apply to?
We live in a fast-paced and fragmented world.  People suffer crises and tragedies, but they often don’t have caregivers they can count on. Family members and friends may be scattered across the continent-or even the world.  Neighborhoods rarely offer the support they once did.  So when a crisis or challenge hits, many people have no one to turn to and end up facing it alone.
Congregations today are overwhelmed with needs for care-the needs of their own members and the needs of people in the surrounding community.
  • People who are hospitalized
  • Those who are grieving
  • Those suffering loneliness or discouragement
  • People who are divorced or separated
  • Those who are dying-and their families and friends
  • Unemployed persons
  • People fighting cancer or another debilitating illness
  • People providing long-term care to a loved one
  • Those dealing with the losses and challenges of relocating
  • Parents whose children have left home
  • Those who are homebound, convalescing, or rehabilitating
  • New parents
  • Single parents
  • Victims of disasters
  • Those in a spiritual crisis
 The list goes on. Our wonderful and caring Mother Liz cannot attend to everyone without assistance.
Each of us faces periods of crisis, transition or difficulty.  During these times, a caring relationship with someone who will faithfully listen, empathize, pray with and for them, and encourage them with Christ’s love and care can be a tremendous benefit. The Stephen Minister will meet with the hurting person once a week for about an hour. During this time, the Stephen Minister listens to the care receiver without judgement or a “fix it” mentality. Ours is a process-oriented form of care and support. We walk alongside you as you move through tough times. We take a vow to God to keep the relationship and anything said completely confidential. All Stephen Ministers are paired with care receivers of the same gender. Our services are available only to those 18 or over.
Should you be interested or if you know of someone who may benefit from having a Stephen Minister, please contact the church office.
For more information about Stephen Ministry at St. Matthew’s, and a link to the application to become a Stephen Minister, click here.
Stephen Ministries also has a great website:  www.stephenministries.org where you can hear testimonies about the life changing effect Stephen Ministers provide to those who are hurting and in need of care.



Share this on your social network:

2017 Youth Sunday!

Youth Sunday was April 23, 2017.  The Youth led all parts of the service, including helping to give the sermon, which was on Doubt from the story of Doubting Thomas.  Youth used personal stories to illustrate times when doubt served to strengthen their faith.

Read the text of the sermon here. If you’d like to listen to the sermon, click here and scroll down to Sermons.

Thanks be to God for all our wonderfully vibrant young leaders!

 

Youth (and soon-to-be Youth) on Youth Sunday 2017

 



Share this on your social network:

Walking the Path — Musings by Mother Liz

Musing from Mother Liz

If you take a walk towards the pine trees that line Oak Road, you will notice some recent changes.  There is a path through the trees, lined by wood planks.  On a sunny day, one end of the path will be in the sun; the other in shadow.  Depending on your spiritual mood, you can choose to enter in sunshine and finish in shadow, or enter in shadow and move into the light.  Slight breezes cause a murmur in the pines above, and oddly, you don’t notice the traffic that passes on Oak Road. Bible verses on plaques that line the path invite you to slow down; to read affirmations of God’s love, and faithfulness and never-ending support.  You find that you want to take your time as you walk.   The verses speak words of encouragement and the pace allows you to notice your surroundings.  Benches scattered along the path tempt you to slow down even more; to sit and rest, or maybe just breathe.  You are in sacred space, and somehow, your spirit knows that.  It is a gift, offered in hopes that its use would connect us more deeply to God.

Holy Week is also a path – a path that starts in celebration and moves to darkness; from sunshine to shadow.  Holy Week is a time that asks each of us to walk the path with Jesus, from Palm Sunday, through Good Friday, and on to the promise of Easter.  I invite you this week to walk with us, through the various services we will have: Tuesday’s service of Reconciliation and Healing, Wednesday’s Healing Eucharist; Maundy Thursday, with washing of hands and feet and stripping of the altar, the Thursday Night Watch, Good Friday services, the Vigil of Easter on Saturday, and Easter services on Sunday.  I also encourage you to take time to walk this Meditation Path, and allow it to give quiet space for reflection and prayer.

The Meditation Path is a creation of Josh Hurst, done as part of the requirements for becoming an Eagle Scout, the highest achievement or rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program in America.  I read that only 4% of boy scouts are granted this rank, and the process is a long one.  I am thankful that Josh thought of St. Matthew’s when he defined his project.  He has given us a profound space in which to reconnect with God, not only during this most holy week, but for always.  Thank you, Josh Hurst.

In Peace, Mother Liz+



Share this on your social network: